Category Archives: Christ

PRIMER ON POSTMILLENNIALISM (4)

glowing-crossPMT 2017-007 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

I am continuing a study on the millennial reign of Christ. In this article I will focus on:

Christ and the Postmillennial Hope

In Christ’s earthly ministry we witness the coming of the prophesied kingdom. For instance, in Mark 1:15 we hear the Lord himself proclaim: “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and believe in the gospel.” Thus, not only does he declare that “the” time is fulfilled (the prophetically-expected time) and that the “kingdom of God is at hand,” but he also associates it with the proclamation of the gospel. Later in Matthew 12:28 we read him state: “if I cast out demons by the Spirit of God, then the kingdom of God has come upon you.” Continue reading

“JOY TO THE WORLD”

joy-to-the-worldPMT 2016-095 by Jordan Wilson

Public Service Announcement:

“Joy to the World” is a Christmas song. Don’t get me wrong, I’m for singing it all year round, but I think it is especially appropriate to sing at Christmas.

To my fascination, I’ve seen a couple articles floating around which essentially misinterpret the song by forcing their own eschatological presuppositions and “poo poo” its traditional characterization as a Christmas song. Those of us who understand it in the sense of being a celebration of the first advent are then issued a slap on the wrist along with a disapproving tsk tsk. Continue reading

A KING IS BORN

king-size-bedPMT 2016-094 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

If you reading this on the date  of its original posting: Merry Christmas! If not, then Happy Whatever.

The original Christmas was a time fully anticipating the postmillennial hope in history. Not only are many of our Christmas hymns very postmillennial, but they are so because the biblical narrative presenting Christ’s birth is!

But now to work! Continue reading

CHRISTMAS AND POSTMILLENNIALISM

christmas-babyPMT 2016-093 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

We are in the Christmas season and heading toward a new year. We must not forget the message of Christmas; we must take it with us through the season and into the new year God is granting us. You might remember that Bing Crosby sang: “I’m Dreaming of a Postmillennial Christmas.” Whereas Elvis was apparently an amillennialist when he sang: “I’ll Have a Blue Christmas.”

Postmillennialists can easily use Christmas texts to present the postmillennial hope. In doing such, they show that Christmas should not simply create a momentary joy as we turn our attentions away from our problems for a brief period. Rather Christmas is deeply embedded in the postmillennial hope. Continue reading

DOES GOD FORBID ALL IMAGES OF CHRIST?

cross-stitch-2PMT 2016-069 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

On Facebook I recently posted a cartoon exposing the error of Arminianism. Ever since posting that cartoon which contained a (cartoon) representation of Christ, I have been inundated with FB Comments and email challenges.

Some FB friends get frustrated because I don’t engage in FB debates. I don’t do so because they are unending and my day isn’t. I am quite busy. My time on FB looks more ample than it is: I see or think of something that I think is interesting, then quickly go on FB and toss it on my FB page, then leave. Though every now and then I will occasionally reply once or twice.

But for those interested in this particular issue, I will be providing a lengthy article combining my thoughts on defending pictorial representations of Christ. This will be useful in the future when I need to point someone to one source.

My interest in this matter is not because I like pictures of Christ. In fact, I don’t have any hanging in my house, I prefer hanging my wife’s cross-stitched, framed Bible verses in my house. Nor do I think some artist knows what he really looked like. No one does, but neither do they know what Abraham and Paul looked like, though folks accept pictures of them in educational contexts. Nor do I think pictures of Christ are helpful to one’s devotion to him. In fact, I believe quite the opposite: if someone is spiritually encouraged by a picture of Jesus, they are looking in the wrong direction for encouragement. It should come from reading God’s word, not looking at pictures men have painted. Continue reading

DISPENSATIONALISM AND CHRIST THE POLITICIAN

PMT 2015-110 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.Christ President

In my previous article I began a brief study considering some of the leading errors in classic (populist) dispensationalism. I opened with a presentation of the Christological distortions inherent in the system — which is significant in that Christ lies at the very center of Christianity. I will continue my concern with those Christological distortions in this article.

One of the difficulties dispensationalists have in understanding the Messianic kingdom promised by the prophets is with regard to its fundamental nature. Several major misconceptions lead them astray in this regard. We highlight but three: they assert of the Messianic kingdom that it will (1) be a future, earthly, Armageddon-introduced, political system, (2) require the physical presence of Christ on earth, and (3) be fundamentally Jewish in purpose and character. Continue reading

DISPENSATIONALISM DISTORTS CHRIST’S RULE

PMT 2015-109 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr. Crown

In this and the next few blog articles, I will be highlighting three types of distortions involved in classic dispensationalism, the most wildly popular eschatological position in the modern evangelical market. These distortions are harmful to a balanced Christian worldview. In this brief series, I have chosen to cover classic dispensational errors in the areas of christology, redemptive history, and contemporary historical progress. There are, of course, many other areas that I could consider.

Before I begin considering these, it should be understood that, as in any system, there will be some internal disagreements among its adherents. The aspects I have chosen for scrutiny are broadly popular, even if some of the details of the following features are debated by dispensational theologians. Continue reading